| Print |

Compagnie Française de l'Orient et de la Chine. Photo: Francis Amiand

Compagnie Française de l'Orient et de la Chine. Photo: Francis Amiand

Compagnie Française de l'Orient et de la Chine. Photo: Francis Amiand

Compagnie Française de l'Orient et de la Chine. Photo: Francis Amiand

Address 170 boulevard Haussmann; 75008 Paris
by rue de Courcelles
Neighbourhood 8th Arrondissement – Faubourg-du-Roule | See on map
Metro Saint-Philippe-du-Roule [M9, M13], Miromesnil [M9]
Telephone +33 1 53 56 07 02
Website http://www.cfoc.fr/
https://www.facebook.com/CompagnieFrancaiseDeLOrientEtDeLaChine
Hours Mon-Sat 10-19

Forgive the French for being entirely preoccupied with themselves for once, and swap your Louis XV chairs for the oriental objets here. After a thorough overhaul, the Compagnie Francaise de L’Orient et de la Chine has reopened its doors on the chic boulevard Haussmann.

The beautiful slick interiors of polished wood and white-washed walls echo a Japanese purity but everything from lights and stationary to outdoor furniture and art is on offer at this emporium of exotic gems. Though the CFOC opened in 1966 to house the extensive collection gathered by adventurous founder and globetrotter François Dautresme, it’s since developed into more of a design house in its own right.

That means the store has chinoiseries found and sourced from the region, as well as its own limited edition collections, inspired by Indochina and the Far East but created by contemporary designers from both home and abroad. You’ll find pieces by young Japanese and Chinese artisans as well as local French names like Gilles Caffier, Margaux Keller and design agency A+A Cooren (Aki and Arnaud).

The place is now sleeker, brighter and more contemporary, but perhaps the biggest change comes courtesy of the new restaurant, Yoko, with Korean chef Young Kyu Park and Groupe Black Code’s Japanese master Toyofumi Ozuru at the helm. Open from breakfast to high tea, there’s an East-meets-West menu served on the terrace, via Kyoto-style Caesar salads and club sandwiches made with Japanese bread, while traditionalists can head to the sushi bar where sashimi and California makis go unmolested by cross-cultural references.